Battersea Dogs and Cats Home has a long history of caring for dogs which have been abandoned or whose owners were unable to cope. Unfortunately many dogs at Battersea arrived because their previous owners only considered what they wanted their dog to look like – not its background and behaviour patterns.

As a result Battersea has seen a rise in the number of pure breed dogs it receives as well as a rise in the number of dogs that need country homes.

The most popular dogs purchased by misinformed town dwellers are, incredibly, Border Collies. These dogs love mental and physical stimulation – they are bored silly in the city and need space and air and things to chase.

Other breeds unhappy with life in the city are Jack Russell Terriers (miniature whirlwinds), Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers (both have endless reserves of energy and stamina), Springer Spaniels (originally bred for retrieving they have energy and stamina reserves to rival the Labradors and Golden Retrievers) and Lurchers (a very strong chase instinct coupled with very bad recall means a three legged Lurcher in the city).

Battersea has also lately seen a rise in Japanese and American Akitas. These awe inspiring dogs were originally used as hunters in Japan, therefore they have a very low tolerance of other dogs and so need to move to an area with a low dog population.

These are examples of some of the breeds which are unhappy in the city, and over the next few months dogs like these will be looking for places to live where they are more at home, with loving owners who can give them the attention they need.

This month, the dogs which require immediate housing are Miss Medina and Bex.

Miss Medina

Springer Spaniel cross

10 years old

Female

adopt a rescue dog

Miss Medina is a gentle soul with a funny side that will bring hours of entertainment. She can put on quite a show – sit, beg, paw, down – in exchange for a treat. At her advancing years, we thought the stress of the kennel environment would be too much for her so she’s been living with a foster family who already adore her.

She’s an easy going dog, fully housetrained and good on the lead. She’s friendly with all the family and is quite happy being in the car or left alone at home for a while. She doesn’t like other dogs running up to her (old lady’s prerogative) so would prefer to live in a more rural area or the suburbs with a lower dog population. She also likes being the centre of attention so should be the only dog in the family. It is not easy starting again at Medina’s age but if you can accept her for what she is, she will make a loving and loyal pet. She is also very pretty for a girl of her age with the softest coat which makes cuddling her a real pleasure.

Medina’s next owners needs to be her last, so if you think you can give this golden girl the home she so deserves, please come down and register at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, London, apply online at www.dogshome.org or call our rehoming team on 020 7627 9234, quoting reference 08/00212.

Bex

Giant Schnauzer Gordon Setter cross

8 years old

Male

Bex is a gentle giant with a shaggy coat and appealing eyes. He’s been with us for six months now, probably due to his daunting size, but he is a loving, affectionate dog who would make a loyal addition to the right home.

He will need confident owners who can cope with his strength and need for space. He is lacking some social skills but these are improving all the time and he will happily mix with other dogs whilst out and about on walks. He needs to live in a rural area in a home with a garden with plenty of space for him to potter about in. Although eight years of age, he still has plenty of energy and enjoys his walks, so his new owners must have the time to give him the stimulation he needs.

Bex really is a unique dog with so much to offer. If you have the space and time to devote to this wonderful character, please contact the rehoming team at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, Old Windsor on 01784 494443, apply online at www.dogshome.org or email us on bow.rehomers@dogshome.org, quoting reference 07/04207.

* Read more on greyhounds which require rehoming