This year's competition is as fierce as it is creative. Take a look at our top choices for Shed of the Year 2018.

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Entering it’s 11th year, the Shed of the Year competition blends style and substance to produce beautiful and useful work and living spaces, dotted around the country’s gardens.

Andrew Wilcox, founder of Shed of the Year and dubbed ‘Head Sheddie’, claims to have been ‘blown away’ by the 2,971 entries which the competition received this year.

‘I’ve judged the finalists eleven years running now, and it’s amazing to see how the sheds evolve each year as entrants take inspiration from others and realise that creating your own shed on a budget is a more than achievable project’.

It’s always an enormous amount of fun – and if you like you can vote for the winner on the competition website, www.readersheds.co.uk, where there are also pictures of all the shortlisted sheds. But we’ve picked out a few of our particular favourites below.


Shed and Breakfast

Reminiscent of a country B&B, Shed & Breakfast boasts a king sized bed and it’s own kitchenette. Owner Daisy Bass and her husband host homeless Bristol youth in this quaint accommodation once a month.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


The Big Top Den

Steve Burrows built this charmingly colourful play area into an old Wisteria tree for the benefit of his grandsons.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


Boat Pod

Submitted into the ‘unique’ category of the competition, Boat Pod is constructed from the bow of an old fish trawler, originally built in 1945.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


Noah’s

Built during a period of torrential rain by owner David, joking neighbours who visited the pub two-by-two christened this uniquely designed shed, built almost entirely of recycled materials.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


Viking Bauhutte

Resembling the upturned hull of a ship, owner Chris Walter built this space for his family to use as a craft room, and for himself to design and build cameras.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


Buenai Vista

Buenai Vista was designed to emulate the environment around it, with panels reflecting the nearby steam, iron–age hillfort and woodland. His wife has affectionately renamed it ‘The Prosecco Palace’.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


The Bush Inn

Build to form a part of a recreated wartime village in Kent, The Bush Inn perfectly captures the essence of the public houses of that period.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year


The Taxi

Owner Lee Connelly and his team abandoned their attempts to repair an old vintage car and instead transformed the car into a bedroom and creative space.

Cuprinol Shed of the Year

See the full shortlist and vote for your favourite shed at www.readersheds.co.uk.