Could an orangery be the perfect place for a kitchen?

A light-filled extension created the perfect setting for this sociable Berkshire kitchen.

An orangery by David Salisbury added to the rear of this elegant Berkshire house offered generous space for a kitchen-dining room and Martin Moore’s English collection creates a timeless feel.

‘‘Each zone has a specific function and allows each piece of furniture to shine’

‘To make sense of a large room, we have to think of it in terms of distinct, but connected, areas,’ explains Richard Moore. ‘Each zone has a specific function and allows each piece of furniture to shine.’ To create a sense of cohesion, the same flooring – Lulworth sandstone from Artisans of Devizes – has been used throughout.

‘The Aga is framed in a simple over-mantel, with an antiqued mirror splashback to reflect light and boost the sense of space’

A butler’s pantry next to the dining table is designed to store table linen and serving dishes. Around the corner, a walk-in larder is for dry goods and glazed wall cabinets show off glassware. The Aga is framed in a simple over-mantel, with an antiqued mirror splashback to reflect light and boost the sense of space and the freezer is built into the wall to minimise its bulk.

‘‘The combination of soft colours in the room serves not only to create subtle distinction between zones, it also adds the warmth and interest.’

The island is designed for socialising, food preparation and storage and is the focal point of the room, painted in Fence Green by Marston & Langinger Paints www.mandlpaints.com). Three pendant lights from Pooky (www.pooky.com) accentuate the eye-catching effect.

‘The combination of soft colours in the room serves not only to create subtle distinction between zones, it also adds the warmth and interest that make this room as inviting as it is hard-working,’ says Richard.

To find out more about Matin Moore and his range of timless handmade kitchens , visit www.martinmoore.com.