The Royal British Legion is encouraging people to remember those who served in the First World War by planting living tributes

Why not plant your own living tribute?

Why not plant your own floral tribute?

The Royal British Legion, the country’s leading armed forces charity and the official ‘National Custodian of Remembrance’, is launching a new campaign, ‘Centenary Gardens’, in partnership with Ashridge Nurseries of Somerset.

To mark the one hundred year anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War this year, the Legion is encouraging people, families and communities to plant living tributes to those men and women who served 1914-18, in the shape of trees, flowers or even entire gardens.

Trees, shrubs and roses can bought via the website ‘Centenary Gardens’, with all profits going directly to the Legion to help them provide care and support to members of the British armed forces, past and present.

Frances de Bosdari of Ashridge Nurseries says: ‘The centenary of the First World War is an opportunity for everyone to remember the sacrifices made so long ago and support those who serve today. By planting something from the Centenary Gardens range people can do both.’

Thoughts echoed by Dr Stephen Clarke, Head of Remembrance at the Legion: ‘The idea of planting a living legacy in commemoration of those who died in the First World War brings to life the notion of passing on the torch of Remembrance to the next generation.’

The campaign, which will run for four years, is part of a wider commemorative effort being led by the Royal British Legion to commemorate all those who served during the war, and especially the 1,117,077 Commonwealth men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice. The Legion is also launching a ‘Centenary Fields’ campaign, in which they hope to protect one green space in every local authority in the country. You can read more about the Legion’s other centenary plans and campaigns on their website.

So, click on the link below, and support the Legion by planting your own living tribute, be it a flower, tree or new garden.

Visit: www.centenarygardens.co.uk