Interior designer Bunny Turner has indulged her passion for art by transforming her bedroom into her own private gallery.

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The experience of studying at the Courtauld left Bunny Turner with a weakness for prints and paintings. ‘I’m a real magpie and always keep my eyes peeled—from galleries to church fêtes, nowhere is safe!’

The pictures in her bedroom are favourite pieces: Michael Landy’s Nourishment print in the centre of the collection was one of the first pieces she ever bought. It hangs below a Richard Wentworth and beside an Alpine landscape that she found in a junk shop while on holiday in France. ‘The memory of first seeing a piece and of falling in love with it is very powerful,’ Bunny says.

Here, the gallery of pictures accentuates the role of the bed as the focus of the room. The art is arranged in a shape echoing that of the curved headboard and is hung on walls painted in Farrow & Ball Hardwick White, which provides a warm-grey backdrop that offsets the pictures beautifully.

Bunny advises laying pictures out on the floor and shuffling them around. ‘It tends to be best to hang the larger pictures in the centre and then gradually reduce the scale as you move out,’ she explains.

She suggests having some small pieces to hand to fill voids between the larger works. ‘Above all, don’t overthink it – it’s usually much better to trust your first instinct.’

Bunny adds that she likes to move pictures around in her home: ‘It’s amazing how different a picture can feel in a new environment and also how different a room can feel with fresh art.’

Bunny Turner is a founding partner of interior design company Turner Pocock.


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